archatlas:

River Structures Paul Hirzel

  • River House I ‘The Bridge’ with 2,310sqf conditioned space is the living-guest quarters and it sets approx. 12 feet above grade. A 15-foot deep steel Howe truss system spans 80 feet at the center span with 32/16 foot balancing cantilevers at each end. The steel bridge truss supports a wood lattice that shades conditioned space below.
  • River House II ‘The Lookout’ with 1,139sqf conditioned space is a multiuse space 1000 feet up river from the main structure. It is constructed with an inverted steel truss exoskeleton which cantilevers 40 feet over the river to view a rare Steelhead spawning pool below. 

instagram:

Appreciating Architecture with @yukomouton

For more of Yuko’s collection of architecture, follow @yukomouton on Instagram.

“I can’t quite describe my fascination with architecture in words, but I think I am intrigued by the idea of creating space,” says Tokyo Instagrammer Yuko Kawauchi (@yukomouton). While architectural photography is mainly a personal interest for Yuko, it also becomes a source of inspiration for her work as a fashion designer. “Geometric shapes found in buildings,” she explains, “do shine through in my pattern sketches and cuttings.”

Yuko’s initial appreciation for architecture developed after she went to an old building to take photos for Instagram. “I had thought that architecture and fashion were two completely different fields until then, but they actually do share certain terminologies and that got me further interested.”

Now, Yuko’s Instagram photos have become a collection of uniquely shaped structures found all over Tokyo—as well as from other cities around the world—including museums, churches, libraries and apartment buildings. “I don’t consider my photos to be a work of art,” she says. “I share these photos hoping to inform people about these locations and spark their curiosity about visiting them.”


nycartscene:

thru Sept 7:“Object Matter” Robert HeineckenThe Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCThis is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

nycartscene:

thru Sept 7:

Object Matter
 Robert Heinecken

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

This is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 


archatlas:

Frank Gehry: The Musical

Dancing architectural models channel “West Side Story” as a group of artists pay homage to the architect in an unusual exhibition.

"Depending on the time you enter the massive space, you may see eight models of Gehry’s major works—the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Facebook’s West Campus Building, and an unrealized proposal for the National Art Museum of China, among them—engaged in a kind of ballet. Thanks to the wheels attached to the tables on which the models sit and to the rhythmic labor of a few Arles-based human handlers, the constructions have been moving since April in a dance imagined by Tino Seghal, an artist celebrated for orchestrating “constructed situations” that often involve performers and unfold over time. Their movements are set to a score by venerable French composer Pierre Boulez. Seghal gave the handlers a list of movements, but they decide which to put in motion and when. At one point, on a recent visit, as the Guggenheim Bilbao and the Disney Concert Hall came rushing together, they stopped just short of collision to twirl away in separate directions, bringing to mind a Sharks-versus-Jets situation from “West Side Story.”

Read the full article here.